You are here
Home > News > Justice min says no green light to justice reforms anymore

Justice min says no green light to justice reforms anymore

Zbigniew Ziobro, Poland's justice minister, has said the green light to reforming the Polish justice system went out when Mateusz Morawiecki took over the prime minister's post from Beata Szydlo in December 2017.
Albert Zawada/PAP

Zbigniew Ziobro, Poland’s justice minister, has said the green light to reforming the Polish justice system went out when Mateusz Morawiecki took over the prime minister’s post from Beata Szydlo in December 2017.

In a Twitter post on Sunday, Ziobro posted a picture of Morawiecki with a caption which read: “I wouldn’t like to die for the justice system.”

Poland has been in conflict with the European Commission (EC) over the country’s overhaul of the justice system, which the EC says has infringed upon EU values and undermined rule of law in Poland.

Recently, the Polish government has agreed to a number of concessions towards the EU in order to gain access to EU post-pandemic funding worth EUR 35.4 billion.

But Ziobro, who is a Eurosceptic, tweeted: “The green light to changes in the justice system ended with the departure of Beata Szydlo.”

“Has the policy of concessions strengthened Poland?” Ziobro asked rhetorically. “Today the justice system, tomorrow the shutting down of Poland’s coal-fired power generation, the day after tomorrow diesel and petrol cars, and what’s next?”

“Concessions only incite the ravenous appetite of the EU,” he said.

Morawiecki’s quote was taken from his Friday statement in Spala, central Poland, in which he argued that the agreement with the EC did not endanger Poland’s sovereignty.

“Ninety-nine percent of the milestones (conditions set by the EC – PAP) are totally in line with Poland’s interests,” Morawiecki said.

“One percent concerns justice system milestones,” he continued. “And you know what? We’ve been reforming this justice system for seven years now. I wouldn’t like to die for the justice system. I mean it. It’s not worth it,” Morawiecki continued.

“What’s worth doing is, first of all, mainting Poland’s sovereignty, this is the most important thing today. KPO (Poland’s EU-funded National Recovery Plan) and all EU funds, which also depend on the programme, work to increase our sovereignty.”

Originally designed for 2021-27, the KPO is worth EUR 35.4 billion, including EUR 23.9 billion in grants and EUR 11.5 billion in loans.


Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /var/www/warsawpoint/data/www/warsawpoint.com/wp-content/themes/accesspress-mag/content-single.php on line 69

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Top